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    James P. Witt

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    TAX: Qualified Tuition Plans (QTPs)

    Posted by James P. Witt on Thu, Jan 7, 2016 @ 12:01 PM

    The Lawletter Vol 40 No 12

    Jim Witt, Senior Attorney, National Legal Research Group

         Given the steep rise in college tuition costs over recent years, the Qualified Tuition Plans ("QTPs") authorized by § 529 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 have become increasingly popular. The following summary describes the basic rules governing QTPs, but, as becomes obvious, the restrictions on these plans are formidable, and the rules can vary from state to state.

         There are two basic types of QTPs, a "prepaid qualified tuition program" and a "qualified tuition program savings plan" (informally known as a "college savings plan"). Under a prepaid qualified tuition program, a person may purchase tuition credits or certificates on behalf of a designated beneficiary (the student) that cover future tuition charges and fees, and, in some cases, a room and board option may be purchased. There is generally a premium charged over the current price of tuition, intended to account for inflation. The benefit of this type of QTP is that it locks in tuition costs to the extent of the credits purchased. Many state-sponsored prepaid tuition programs are guaranteed by the state (this is not true for college savings plans). Most state-sponsored plans require either the owner or the beneficiary of the plan to be a resident of the state (college savings plans have no residency requirement). Prepaid tuition plans have a limited enrollment period (there is no limited enrollment period for college savings plans).

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    Topics: tax, James P. Witt, The Lawletter Vol 40 No 12, QTPs, tax-advantaged strategies

    TAX: Carly Fiorina, Multistate Income Taxation, and the Dormant Commerce Clause

    Posted by James P. Witt on Tue, Sep 22, 2015 @ 13:09 PM

    The Lawletter Vol 40 No 8

    Jim Witt—Senior Attorney, National Legal Research Group

         A feature of recent U.S. presidential campaigns has been the interest of the press and the public (not to mention the requirements of the law) regarding the finances of those competing for the nomination and, ultimately, for the office itself. A key element of those finances has, of course, been the income tax returns of the various candidates. In this connection, one of the present candidates for the Republican nomination, Carly Fiorina, recently offered reporters who came in person to her campaign headquarters in Virginia the opportunity to review her state income tax returns.

         Ms. Fiorina and her husband had already put their federal income tax returns for 2012 and 2013 online, but it is her state income tax returns that are of special interest. She and her husband were required to file such returns in no fewer than 17 states in 2013, with the couple's connection with some of those states so insubstantial that their tax liability in 11 of the states was less than $250.

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    Topics: tax law, James P. Witt, dormant Commerce Clause, The Lawletter Vol 40 No 8

    TRUSTS: Dean Smith Payments to Players—NCAA Violation

    Posted by James P. Witt on Tue, Jun 9, 2015 @ 16:06 PM

    The Lawletter Vol 40 No 4

    Jim Witt, Senior Attorney, National Legal Research Group

         Dean Smith, the head coach of the University of North Carolina ("UNC") men's basketball team from 1961 to 1997, died on February 7, 2015, at age 83. Aside from the tributes paid to the man and his career that captured a good deal of media attention, a specific aspect of Coach Smith's estate plan also stirred up some interest. Following the modern trend, Smith's estate planners made a revocable living trust an important part, if not the centerpiece, of his plan for disposing of his assets at his death. Presumably, Smith transferred the bulk of his estate to the trust and, by doing so, realized a number of advantages for both himself and his estate: (1) privacy—the details of the trust, unlike information concerning an individual's assets that pass by will, do not become part of the public record; (2) because the transfer or transfers of assets to the trust are made during the individual's life, the assets are not subject to probate administration, and the expenses of such procedure are avoided (although the expenses of setting up the trust and having it administered must be considered); (3) the assets of the trust are not frozen, as can happen under a probate proceeding, thereby improving access to the assets for the estate and the heirs; (4) because the trust is revocable, the individual maintains control over the disposition of his or her assets transferred to the trust, because he or she can withdraw particular assets from the trust or dissolve the entire arrangement, which is also essentially true under a will in that a will has no effect until the individual's death.

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    Topics: legal research, trusts, Jim Witt, The Lawletter Vol 40, No 4, trust advantages, NCAA violation

    TAX: Assessed Value Dispute—Robert De Niro's Hudson Valley Compound

    Posted by James P. Witt on Wed, Mar 4, 2015 @ 10:03 AM

    The Lawletter Vol 39 No 12

    Jim Witt, Senior Attorney, National Legal Research Group

         A real property tax assessment dispute involving a large parcel of land in Ulster County, New York, 75 miles north of Manhattan in the Hudson Valley, has recently been settled. The case is of interest for two reasons: (1) It brings into focus the issue of assessed value as based on the uniqueness of the property versus assessed value based on comparable properties in the area; and (2) the property is owned by a Trust on behalf of the actor Robert De Niro and his family.

         The property, well over 50 acres, is located in the town of Gardiner, New York, and has frontage on the Wallkill River (a tributary of the Hudson). The property was acquired in 1997 for $1.5 million, when its main structure was an 18th-century farmhouse, supplemented later by barns. Under De Niro's ownership, the house was renovated to include six bedrooms and seven bathrooms; one barn was converted into a 14,000-square-foot recreation center, containing a game room, gym, basketball court, swimming pool, boxing ring, and small film studio. Another barn was converted into a workshop and another into an office. Also there were $1 million in landscaping expenses to block any view of the property from the road.

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    Topics: tax law, assessment value, property tax

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