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    Personal Injury and Insurance Law Legal Research Blog

    John M. Stone

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    PERSONAL INJURY: Suicide as Intervening Event

    Posted by John M. Stone on Fri, Sep 22, 2017 @ 11:09 AM

    John Stone, Senior Attorney, National Legal Research Group

                According to the "intervening causes doctrine," there can be no proximate cause, as is required for liability in a negligence case, where there has intervened between the act of the defendant and the injury to the plaintiff an independent act or omission of someone other than the defendant, that was not foreseeable by the defendant, was not triggered by the defendant's act, and was sufficient of itself to cause the injury. As a general rule, suicide is deemed an unforeseeable intervening cause of death that absolves the tortfeasor of negligence liability in an action for wrongful death.

                When a mother brought an action against a city and its police officer for wrongful death arising out of her teenage daughter's suicide death, after the officer's disclosure of photographs of the daughter's body following her previous suicide attempt, the claim failed because of the intervening cause doctrine.  City of Richmond Hill v. Maia, No. S16G1337, 2017 WL 2332660 (Ga. May 30, 2017).

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    Topics: suicide, personal injury, intervening cause doctrine, special relationship exception

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